http://www.accessola.com/superconference2007/

LIBRARY BLOGS USING WORDPRESS
Greg Sennema, Electronic Services Librarian, Wilfrid Laurier University.
Laurier Library http://library.wlu.ca/
Technolibrarian http://library.wlu.ca/blogs/gsennema/
Link to presentation: http://library.wlu.ca/blogs/gsennema/wp-content/uploads/2007/01/wordpress.ppt
Getting Started with Blogging Software: http://www.idealware.org/blogging_software/

As libraries consider how to implement Web 2.0 technologies on their Web sites, many will consider blogging software as an effective way to communicate and add content to their Web sites. While there are many solutions available, this session will describe how to install, set up, and customize WordPress, an open source solution that has an active user community among libraries and beyond

Examples: http://www.accessola2.com/olita/insideolita/wordpress/ (Inside OLITA blog)

Other blog software: b2evolution (new ; supports multiple blogs and has categories ; small but growing usergroup)

BEST PRACTICES FOR SOCIAL SOFTWARE IN LIBRARIES
Michael Stephens, Instructor, Dominican University.
See Michael’s Blog: http://www.tametheweb.com/

Here are best practices and implementation strategies for social software such as blogs, wikis and IM in libraries. Get practical take aways, as well as information on where libraries are going with social software and Web 2.0, including the benefits of creating community via conversations. It will be based on Michael Stephens’ ALA Library Technology report on the same topic.

Interesting sites:
http://AADL.org (Ann Arbor District Library — entire website is Web/Library 2.0)
http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/ (NCSU Libraries – great example of Library 2.0)
http://wwwl.meebo.com/index-en.html (instant messaging everywhere)
http://www.secondlife.com (Second Life is a 3-D virtual world entirely built and owned by its residents.)
http://www.infoisland.org/ (Second Life – Library 2.0 site)

CONTRIBUTE TO THE COLLECTIVE COLLECTION, COMRADE
Ross Singer, Application Developer, Georgia Tech Library and Information Centre.

The Library’s catalog is considered a representation of its collection. However, it is really just an inventory of the library’s collection development policies and budget cycles. It does not necessarily reflect the actual resources and actual patron use. Communicat allows our users to add to our collection and organize it into their own personal libraries which they can then share with others. Communicat then becomes an OPAC, social bookmarker, citation manager, research guide, reserves system, and instructional learning tool.

IS SOCIAL SOFTWARE TOO SOCIAL?
Rob Hyndman, business lawyer for technology companies and avid blogger on all things technical; Matthew Ingram, technology writer, the Globe and Mail; Nora Young, founding host of CBC’s DNTO, explores technology and culture on radio, in print, and on television.
Mathew Ingram’s blog: http://www.mathewingram.com/
Rob Hyndman (Law and technology issues): http://www.robhyndman.com/

Our panel of technology commentators from outside the library sector will explore trends in the evolution of the “social Web”. Is the current tendency toward the hyper-social fad, or a fact of life? Is it sustainable? How likely are these trends to make their way into the mainstream – or will they largely remain the domain of youth and a technical elite (alphageeks)? What are the privacy implications? Do users understand? Does it matter? What impact is the social Web having on cultural norms: ideas as central as truth and identity?

RADICAL TRUST: WHY ‘2.0’ REALLY MATTERS TO LIBRARIES
Doug Horne, Head, Academic Liaison, University of Guelph.While there are many aspects of Web 2.0 that are significant to libraries, perhaps the most important thing is the little-mentioned concept of ‘radical trust’. As libraries ponder ‘2.0’ technologies such as rating systems in OPACs, the ability to comment on the usefulness of items, making systems open source, or even allowing users to contribute content, the change that is being faced is about much more than learning a new technology.

THE CHANGING NATURE OF THE CATALOGUE AND ITS INTEGRATION WITH OTHER DISCOVERY SYSTEMS
Karen Calhoun, Senior Associate University Librarian for Information Technology and Technical Services, Cornell University.
Link to presentation: http://www.loc.gov/catdir/calhoun-report-final.pdf

Consider the factors affecting the future of the library on-line catalogue. Review some planning tools for revitalizing catalogs and consider options for establishing the catalogue – and the collections it describes – within the framework of on-line information discovery tools of all kinds. Based on the findings of a report prepared by the speaker for the Library of Congress.

NOT SO CONFIDENTIAL: EXPOSING 2.0 WEB SITES
John Blyberg, Systems Administrator and Lead Developer, Ann Arbor District Library.
http://AADL.org (Ann Arbor District Library — entire website is Web/Library 2.0)
John Blyberg’s blog: http://www.blyberg.net/

How do we even begin to provide Web-based service to our patrons in a 2.0 world? What does 2.0 mean to libraries and how should we be preparing for it? Consider the latest trends in library Web sites and the services provided through them. Specific examples will give you an idea of what some libraries are currently doing. From social OPACs to Netflix-like service, learn where we might go from here and the tools necessary to make it happen. This session will candidly highlight a number of ways your library can prepare for a major Web site redesign project by redressing some fundamental aspects of your information technology processes and infrastructure.

THE FUTURE OF SEARCH
BRADLEY HOROWITZ, Vice President of Product Strategy, at Yahoo!

In its efforts to re-tool for Web 2.0, Yahoo! has been re-thinking many of the most fundamental elements of the user experience – a daunting challenge for a company that has the largest audience on the net: with half a billion users visiting its properties every month, and over twice the pageviews worldwide of Google.

Central to this re-think, is a belief that human judgment needs to integrated back into the search process. As Bradley emphasizes, “The difference between information and knowledge is really that human factor and that’s what we’re all about.” Yahoo’s Social search research is exploring ways to taps into the collective knowledge of the community to answer questions. “Subjective queries rely on domain expertise. With social search, we are handing back domain expertise to the users.”

Come hear about Yahoo!’s research in this area – and how recent acquisitions like del.icio.us and Flickr fit in its overall “FUSE” vision: helping users not only Find information, but Use it, Share it and Expand upon it.

Sites of Interest:
http://knowledgeontario.ca/ (Knowledge Ontario)
http://www.accessola.com/olita/ (OLITA)
http://www.librarything.com/ (Library Thing : catalog your books online)

back to mylearning

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