I’m a Goodreads Librarian.

November 21, 2010

Goodreads Librarians’s currently-reading book montage

Goodreads Librarians 6273 members

A place where members can work together to improve the Goodreads book catalog.

Activities includ…

Books we’re currently reading



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Share book reviews and ratings with Goodreads Librarians, and even join a book club on Goodreads.

I couldn’t help but get excited about this recent news from Sony. Kudo’s Sony!
Sony Unveils Reader Library Program to Promote Digital Reading at Public Libraries
 
Thanks to Stephen’s Lighthouse for bringing this one to my attention.
 

A recent study by Jakob Nielson confirms that reading long-form in print finds higher reading speeds than on ebook readers. The readability study looked at the reading speed of 24 users using Apple’s iPad, Amazon’s Kindle 2, and traditional print.

Key highlights from the study:

Books are faster than tablets.
“The iPad measured at 6.2% lower reading speed than the printed book, whereas the Kindle measured at 10.7% slower than print.”

User satisfaction: iPad Loved, PCs Hated.
After using each device, users were asked to rate their satisfaction on a 1-7 scale (7 being the best). “The result: iPad, Kindle, and the printed book all scored fairly high at 5.8, 5.7, and 5.6, respectively. The PC, however, scored an abysmal 3.6.”

I found the less predictable comments interesting and concur: “Users felt that reading the printed book was more relaxing than using electronic devices. And they felt uncomfortable with the PC because it reminded them of work.”

What impact will reading speeds have on the sales of ebook readers? While people may read faster with print, there may be little impact on sales of these devices. According to the Association of American Publishers e-book sales from the “13 publishers soared 176.6% in 2009, to $169.5 million”.

As an ebook reader myself, I find that I do read slower on my Sony Reader. What has increased is the number of books that I’ve read over the past 6 months. The convenience of a portable device has encouraged me to read more on-the-go, and hopefully, the readability issues with these devices will be solved in the future.

Learning to eRead

January 2, 2010

Did you receive an ebook reader for Christmas? I did. I’ve spent the past few days learning to eRead on my Sony Reader (Touch Edition).

While I’ve tried the Stanza, Kindle, and Kobo iPhone/Touch apps, nothing compares to the larger 6 inch screen of my Reader. I’m also getting used e-ink. It’s probably the biggest drawback to ebook readers right now. On the plus side, Sony’s Reader software installed very nicely on my Mac, and supports Adobe Digital Editions. The Sony Reader supports the EPUB format, which essentially means there are lots of sources for ebooks.

If you are looking for some free ebooks to download, check out the following sources (and be mindful of the copyright legislation for your country):

Google Books
The Grandfather of free ebook search.

Feedbooks
Click on the “public domain” link to browse thousands of free and original books.

FictionWise
Click on the “free ebooks” link to browse their collection.

Kobo
Click on the “Free ebooks” link to download books for the web, mobile and EPUB format.

Project Gutenburg
Project Gutenberg is the place where you can download over 30,000 free ebooks to read on your PC, iPhone, Kindle, Sony Reader or other portable device.

Project Gutenburg Canada
The ebooks on this website are in the Canadian public domain.

Smashwords
Click on the “filter by: free ebooks” to browse for ebooks by indie authors and publishers.

As well, don’t forgot to check out your local library.  I’ve already borrowed several ebooks from Vaughan Public Libraries. Sony also hosts a library finder page, where you can browse for local libraries that offer ebooks for loan.

If you are considering an ebook reader purchase, be sure to read Gadget Lab’s How to Choose an eBook Reader, and the exhaustive ebook reader comparison chart on the Mobile Read Wiki.

Happy eReading!


What Matters Now

December 23, 2009

Looking for a good read over the holidays?  Take a look at Mashable’s 10 must-read ebooks for social media lovers.

I’ve just finished reading What Matters Now.  #10 on the list, it’s a series of micro-essays from Seth Godin and 70 other “big-thinkers”.

If you read one last ebook in 2009, this should be it.  Thought-provoking. Inspiring.

Get it.

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